Keeping Whisky

All your whisky related questions answered here.
Scotchio
Gold Member
Posts: 803
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 10:06 pm
Location: devon uk

Keeping Whisky

Postby Scotchio » Sat Nov 26, 2005 10:17 pm

Being a man of slender means but expensive tastes I was wondering if anyone has a good solution for staving off the negative effects of oxidization beyond 'drink it'!
I have a great love of Brora, 1970s Ardbeg and Port Ellen and have a few bottles of each stashed away for the future but ideally once opened I'd like to be able to return to these bottles as an occasional treat. I am considering rebottling to 35 and 20cl bottles to reduce air contact and frequency of letting the genie out and fresh air in. Has anyone tried this or had any success with other methods?
Any suggestions gratefully received
Scotchio[/b]

Admiral
Triple Gold Member
Posts: 2724
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2003 2:01 am
Location: Australia

Postby Admiral » Sat Nov 26, 2005 11:19 pm

Hi Scotchio, and welcome!

This topic has been discussed at length, under numerous thread headings, and in fact was discussed with great enthusiasm quite recently.

Have a look through the forum archives and search for things like "How long does a bottle last", "Oxidation", "How quickly should I drink a whisky", and topics along those lines.

The questions you've asked have been answered directly in those previous threads.

Cheers,
Admiral

Deactivated Member

Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Nov 26, 2005 11:27 pm

What he said.

Until someone comes out with Scotch-In-A-BoxTM, decanting to 20cl bottles, if you have enough of them, seems like a good idea.

Badmonkey
Gold Member
Posts: 531
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 3:08 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Contact:

Postby Badmonkey » Sun Nov 27, 2005 8:32 am

My preferred technique is to pick up the pace once I hit the 50% mark、finish the bottle with a few good friends, and then move on to the next one. It's a low-tech solution, and an impractical one for people with a large collection, but it has served me well over the past few years.

Cheers, and welcome.

Badmonkey

Scotchio
Gold Member
Posts: 803
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 10:06 pm
Location: devon uk

Postby Scotchio » Sun Nov 27, 2005 10:08 am

Thanks chaps,I will seek out the previous discussions

Habanero
New member
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 4:10 pm

Postby Habanero » Tue Nov 29, 2005 5:52 pm

Man I have NEVER faced this problem - I am always kicking myself in the ass for going through a very nice bottle like it was freaking Boone's Farm or something. I will never have an oxidation problem - that is for sure.

nicholtl
Bronze Member
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2005 3:30 am
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
Contact:

Postby nicholtl » Tue Nov 29, 2005 11:03 pm

I wonder if a poor-man's solution could simply be to place your lips to the bottle opening, suck in as much air from the bottle as your lungs will hold, then quickly re-cork it?

Deactivated Member

Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Nov 30, 2005 12:29 am

Unless you swallow the cork.

Lawrence
Matured cask
Posts: 5019
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 1:01 am
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada

Postby Lawrence » Wed Nov 30, 2005 2:17 am

That would suck.






:D

MGillespie
Double Gold Member
Posts: 1704
Joined: Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:17 pm
Location: New Jersey, United States

Postby MGillespie » Wed Nov 30, 2005 2:38 am

Remember, nature abhors a vacuum. It might be better to leave well enough alone...unless you can adapt one of those wine preservation systems that replaces the air in the bottle with an inert gas.

Mark

kallaskander
Double Gold Member
Posts: 1119
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2005 12:47 pm
Location: Heddesheim, Germany

Postby kallaskander » Wed Nov 30, 2005 9:32 am

Hi there,

unless you have a build in vacuum pump and a lightspeed recorking machine in your mouth you will have to cope with the inevitable. No way to drink and keep the whisky.

Greetings
kallaskander

MGillespie
Double Gold Member
Posts: 1704
Joined: Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:17 pm
Location: New Jersey, United States

Postby MGillespie » Sun Dec 04, 2005 2:59 am

There's an update on this topic at the Scotch Blog...

http://www.scotchblog.com

Mark

ScotchBlog
Bronze Member
Posts: 113
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 8:58 pm
Location: USA
Contact:

Postby ScotchBlog » Thu Dec 08, 2005 8:54 pm

MGillespie wrote:There's an update on this topic at the Scotch Blog...

http://www.scotchblog.com

Mark


Thanks Mark...it's actually http://www.thescotchblog.com...I'm still waiting for the unused http://www.scotchblog.com to become available.

voigtman
New member
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 1:40 am
Location: Easthampton, MA USA

Postby voigtman » Thu Dec 08, 2005 11:41 pm

Pulling a vacuum over the whisky is not a good idea: more than just air, water vapor and ethanol is removed that way. It reduces oxidation, sure, but it definitely degrades the whisky: the most volatile components, which may be important in the nose, are preferentially suctioned away. Enough to taste? Who knows? I'm not trying it, that's for sure.

When I went to the scotch blog site, there was a post from someone who claimed that nitrogen gas (which can be used to displace air in a whisky bottle) was denser than air. No way. The molecular weight of nitrogen is 28.014 g/mole. Air is mostly nitrogen, but roughly 20% oxygen, which has molecular weight 31.999 g/mole. So air is denser than nitrogen. Argon would work fine as a relatively cheap, inert blanket gas. Krypton and xenon would be better, in terms of density, but are far too expensive for such frivolous use, especially Xe. Carbon dioxide is a very poor choice: it is denser than air, but dissolves in aqueous solutions (which all whisk(e)y is) and thereby carbonates it. (Water plus dissolved carbon dioxide is carbonated water, aka "soda water" or "club soda"). Yuck!

Transferring to small bottles with caps that can resist alcohol is viable. Adding lots of scrupulously clean marbles is just plain weird (and an invitation to accidental choking on an errant marble).

I still favor putting a bottle out of its misery when it is down near the end. Just my two cents. Slainte, Ed V.

MGillespie
Double Gold Member
Posts: 1704
Joined: Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:17 pm
Location: New Jersey, United States

Postby MGillespie » Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:16 am

ScotchBlog wrote:
MGillespie wrote:There's an update on this topic at the Scotch Blog...

http://www.scotchblog.com

Mark


Thanks Mark...it's actually http://www.thescotchblog.com...I'm still waiting for the unused http://www.scotchblog.com to become available.


Oops...my mistake! Sorry...

Mark

Deactivated Member

Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Dec 09, 2005 8:28 am

Based on nothing but a single dram left out overnight and pure conjecture, I believe that evaporation of alcohol and other volatiles is the major degrading factor for whisky, rather than oxidation.

Deactivated Member

Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Dec 10, 2005 12:03 pm

I suppose a natural form of vacuum could be achived by keeping whisky in a cool environment.
The chosen bottle could be retrived and brought up to room temp., sampled and re-corked. When returned to the the cellar the drop in temperature would create a slight vacuum in the bottle. Whether that would reduce the effects of oxidation, better folk than I will have to answer.

However, I do think that storing in a cool dark place - not a fridge! - helps keep whisky fresher.

Better still, as mentioned before - if it's open, drink it 'til it's done :D

ScotchBlog
Bronze Member
Posts: 113
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 8:58 pm
Location: USA
Contact:

Postby ScotchBlog » Sun Dec 11, 2005 12:15 am

Everyone, great comments.
Feel free to leave your opinion on The Scotch Blog as well, so that people can see all of the differing opinions.

I'm a little worried about the long-term use of them as well...
I do trust Brett's opinion, but I can see that as a long term solution - probably not the best one...


Return to “Questions & Answers”



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 1 guest