Peated single malts

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Lord_Pfaffin
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Peated single malts

Postby Lord_Pfaffin » Mon Mar 28, 2005 7:49 am

Whisky that has little character made to attact a broader appeal usually fits into the genre of the un-peated single malts. As a result of this thinking my preferance for tasting has moved toward the peated malts. I do love a whiskey that tastes fine and makes a statement as well without being overly spirity or peppery.
I found Connemara to be the finest that i have tasted as yet, enjoyed the Glen Garioch 10 yr old.
Any recommendations along this line would be very welcome. or directions to a listing of peated delights.

Thankyou very much. :)

lexkraai
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Postby lexkraai » Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:18 am

If you want to explore peated malts more, then try one or more of the following:

Laphroaig
Lagavulin
Talisker
Brora
Longrow

Others will no doubt add to this wee list


Enjoy!
Lex

hpulley
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Postby hpulley » Mon Mar 28, 2005 1:10 pm

Ardbeg of course! Glenfarclas is a speysider with a fair amount of peat in it. Ledaig can be very peaty, highland park and Talisker too.

Harry

lexkraai
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Postby lexkraai » Mon Mar 28, 2005 3:47 pm

How on earth could I forget to list what is probably my favourite distillery??? Thanks Harry!

Lex

Deactivated Member

Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Mar 28, 2005 6:32 pm

A step or so down, Clynelish and Old Pulteney.

Unpeated (or low-peat) malts are not necessarily without character; it's just more subtle. Fans of those types of malts might feel that huge amounts of smoke only cover up the true character of the spirit. Very early in my malt career, I latched onto Lagavulin and Talisker, then Ardbeg. It's only fairly recently that I am coming around to appreciate the character of less smoky malts, and I have to say that it's Bruichladdich that really opened my eyes. Yes, there are quite a lot of bland blendfillers out there, but there are jewels, also. I certainly haven't abandoned the peat monsters, which are still among my favorites, but I now have a far wider palette from which to choose, to suit the mood of the day. As well, the contrast highlights my appreciation. A constant barrage of smoke can wear you down after a while.

By all means go ahead and enjoy your exploration of the peaty malts, LP, but don't write off everything else; at some point in the future you may want to expand your tasting list. Enjoy.

Lord_Pfaffin
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Postby Lord_Pfaffin » Mon Mar 28, 2005 8:06 pm

Very greatful for the recommenations.
My first love was a bottle of Glen Rothes witch lay empty after one sitting. Found BruichLaddich, McCallan and Highland Park delicious and quite delightful but as soon as i tasted some peat, oak and smoke i was hooked on the taste.
Lets redefine the paramiters of my quest for the tasting of fine peated malts with witch your helpful imput is most enlightening and appreciated.
Laphroaig's iodine destoyed the effect and scared me away from Islay distilleries thinking that all of them produced a similar poison
Lagavulin & Ardbeg concieved as being harsher than Laphroaig's stomach churning blechhe
Talisker has been discribed as having a peppery and firey finish and i was very much put off by the peppery spiritiness of the Springbank 10 yr that i was too leary of the Longrow
Highland Park 12yr old is super whisky but i dont find it peaty at all

Crispy Critter
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Postby Crispy Critter » Tue Mar 29, 2005 1:43 am

While I've tended to gravitate to the peaty side of the Scotch spectrum, there are times when I want something else. A good Speysider, perhaps, or Highland Park, or even a high-grade blend can be quite welcome, and there's always at least one bourbon and at least one Irish on my shelf.

Sometimes I've been more adventurous with off-the-beaten-path drams like Yamazaki or St. George - and I'm glad I've tried them.

Lately, I have been a bit more disciplined about not keeping too many bottles open at once, but it can be tempting sometimes! :roll:

Lawrence
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Postby Lawrence » Tue Mar 29, 2005 2:12 am

Try Benroamch Traditional, I think you'll be surprised by the peat that comes and goes.

Deactivated Member

Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Mar 29, 2005 2:29 am

It's lovely to let a Benromach
Trickle down into your stomach.

--from the collected beer & whisky couplets of Mr Tattie Heid

Frodo
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Postby Frodo » Wed Mar 30, 2005 1:39 am

Lord Pfaffin:

I would recommend Clynelish and Bowmore as two choices that have some peat, but aren't too "over the top".

Frodo

rthomson
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Postby rthomson » Wed Mar 30, 2005 4:57 am

MrTattieHeid wrote:It's lovely to let a Benromach
Trickle down into your stomach.

--from the collected beer & whisky couplets of Mr Tattie Heid


Truly up there with Shakespeare, Shelley and Burns.

You got to 500 posts by giving us this?! :wink: :D

It takes a TattieHeid
To encourage me to read
About something other than whisky.
And let's not mention Mr. Picky. :wink:

Ron

Deactivated Member

Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 30, 2005 5:23 am

rthomson wrote:You got to 500 posts by giving us this?! :wink: :D

It takes a TattieHeid
To encourage me to read
About something other than whisky.
And let's not mention Mr. Picky. :wink:

Ron


:roll: Well, I hope you're not planning to hit 500 with verse like that! :oops:

rthomson
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Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 6:30 pm

Postby rthomson » Wed Mar 30, 2005 5:31 am

MrTattieHeid wrote:
:roll: Well, I hope you're not planning to hit 500 with verse like that! :oops:


I couldn't resist :D Anyway, I'm much better with free verse. (Oh, I should just stay away from prosody and get back to drinking).

robs42
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Posts: 68
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 11:50 am

Postby robs42 » Wed Mar 30, 2005 8:02 am

To be honest, Whisky and bad poetry go together, or at least Scotland and bad poetry do - the world's worst poet ever, William McGonagall was from Dundee, but alas, he was not a great fan of drink:

Alas! strong drink makes men and women fanatics,
And helps to fill our prisons and lunatics;
And if there was no strong drink such cases wouldn't be,
Which would be a very glad sight for all christians to see.


Unfortunately, this is one of his better constructed verses.

Deactivated Member

Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 30, 2005 1:43 pm

Ardmore is a wonderfully peaty whisky with perfect balance and glorious complexity - sadly quite difficult to find, though. Isle of Jura Superstition is peaty, but something about it doesn't quite feel right.

patrick dicaprio
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Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2005 3:22 am

Postby patrick dicaprio » Fri Apr 01, 2005 3:28 am

MrTattieHeid wrote:A step or so down, Clynelish and Old Pulteney.

Unpeated (or low-peat) malts are not necessarily without character; it's just more subtle. Fans of those types of malts might feel that huge amounts of smoke only cover up the true character of the spirit. Very early in my malt career, I latched onto Lagavulin and Talisker, then Ardbeg. It's only fairly recently that I am coming around to appreciate the character of less smoky malts, and I have to say that it's Bruichladdich that really opened my eyes. Yes, there are quite a lot of bland blendfillers out there, but there are jewels, also. I certainly haven't abandoned the peat monsters, which are still among my favorites, but I now have a far wider palette from which to choose, to suit the mood of the day. As well, the contrast highlights my appreciation. A constant barrage of smoke can wear you down after a while.

By all means go ahead and enjoy your exploration of the peaty malts, LP, but don't write off everything else; at some point in the future you may want to expand your tasting list. Enjoy.


clynelish might be the best overall whisky for those looking for peat but not lagavulin. i also agree with what you say about the less smoky malts. i think part of it is that when you are a novice (which i still consider myself) you are much impressed by something that is readily identifiable, and something more complex that takes some effort is beyond your ken. thats how i feel about myself anyway.

Pat

patrick dicaprio
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Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2005 3:22 am

Postby patrick dicaprio » Fri Apr 01, 2005 3:29 am

hpulley wrote:Ardbeg of course! Glenfarclas is a speysider with a fair amount of peat in it. Ledaig can be very peaty, highland park and Talisker too.

Harry


really?? i found little to no peat in glenfarclas, although maybe it is just overpowered by the sweetness.

Pat

rthomson
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Postby rthomson » Fri Apr 01, 2005 4:43 am

patrick dicaprio wrote:
hpulley wrote:Ardbeg of course! Glenfarclas is a speysider with a fair amount of peat in it. Ledaig can be very peaty, highland park and Talisker too.

Harry


really?? i found little to no peat in glenfarclas, although maybe it is just overpowered by the sweetness.

Pat


I would agree with that. I noticed lots of sherry in the Glenfarclas 21 but didn't really pick up on any peat. But I'm a novice as well and not all that proficient with identifying all of the characteristics of a single malt. One of the things about this forum that is most helpful is the opinions and tasting notes that aid me in judging a dram.

Ron

hpulley
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Joined: Mon Mar 25, 2002 2:01 am

Postby hpulley » Fri Apr 01, 2005 4:45 am

I notice a fair bit in the 15yo, the 105 too. Haven't had the 21yo.

And its a speyside peating level, which is not the in your face level of south shore islays.

Harry


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