Another question regarding order of whisky

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Pipe and dram
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Another question regarding order of whisky

Postby Pipe and dram » Wed Mar 02, 2005 10:07 pm

I am doing a nosing of 4 whiskies, and this time including a blend. and three single malts. Would you put the blend first or last in the nosing

Thanks :)

posterboy
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Postby posterboy » Wed Mar 02, 2005 10:09 pm

First.

The single malts will all have more nuance to the flavor, so having the blend at the end will be anti-climactic.

Admiral
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Postby Admiral » Thu Mar 03, 2005 3:17 am

A bit difficult to give meaningful advice without knowing the blend or the three single malts involved, but - generally speaking - the nose of a blend can be less complex, as all the components tend to drown one another out. Also, it is primarily grain whisky, which can have a weaker nose.

The exception is if you know for a fact that the three single malts are components in the blend. That way, you identify the primary aromas in the single malts, and then go looking for them in the blend.

Johnnie Walker Black Label tastings do this with Cardhu, Lagavulin, and Talisker. You taste the three malts first, and then come to the blend. Whilst most participants agree that the blend is the least exciting of the four whiskies tasted, it is a worthwhile exercise to actually identify the characteristics of the individual malts in the blend.

Cheers,
Admiral

hpulley
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Postby hpulley » Thu Mar 03, 2005 12:47 pm

Whenever I have a blend after a malt the grain whisky sticks out like a sore thumb and I like the blend even less than normal. I find having them first is the only way to do it.

Harry

Tom
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Postby Tom » Thu Mar 03, 2005 5:58 pm

If i was you, i'd take one of the more complex blends, and make the whole nosing blind, see if they can spot it.

Pipe and dram
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Postby Pipe and dram » Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:02 pm

Good points - especiallyl the component malts such as macallan and highland park and use Famous Grouse.

However, this is an introduction to malt whisky so am going to use

Glenfiddich
Macallan
Bowmore

with famous grouse or a light blend

Any other comments??

Admiral
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Postby Admiral » Fri Mar 04, 2005 3:37 am

Famous Grouse would be good for demonstrating the influence of Macallan in a blend.

A lighter blend, e.g. Grants, or something, might end up tasting too similar to Glenfiddich! :wink:

(In other words, there might be merit in choosing a blend that doesn't come from the same parentage as the malts, which is certainly the case for Grouse/Macallan, and Grants/Glenfiddich).

I think your choice of malts as an introduction is fantastic!

Your participants will get an excellent introduction and taste three malts that are perfect representatives of three different styles.

Cheers,
Admiral

Pipe and dram
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Postby Pipe and dram » Sat Mar 05, 2005 12:20 am

Thanks Admiral - one of my favorite themes is 'where does flavor come from?" by using a lighter whisky (Glenfiddich, Glenlivet, etc) and using a sherried finish ( macallan, Aberlour, etc) and a peated whisky (Bowmore, Laphroaig) it provides a nice range and gets people really involved. This time I am adding a blend just to add to the night since most of the participants are not experts and are really interested in the differences between blends and single malts, etc. As malt nuts, we often assume the novice drinkers are well in tune, but they are not always and really like the nosings because they explain a lot of good stuff for them


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